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cfcm has been a member since June 6th 2011, and has created 2294 posts from scratch.

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Relatives of MaryAnn (Robideau) Jesmer, My G-G-Grandmother in Minnesota.

Relatives of MaryAnn (Robideau) Jesmer in Minnesota.

I was curious about what happened to the siblings and relatives of my great-great-grandmother, Maryann Robideau Jesmer. She married my G-G-grandfather, Joseph A. Jesmer when they were living in upper state New York State. Joseph grew up on a farm in between Bombay and Hogansburg, two small towns that are close together. Many of the Jesmers, got in a train and made the trek our west to Princeton Minnesota and Greenbush Township Minnesota. There they farmed and got involved in a myriad of businesses. They really built up that area.

I got the information from a very extensive web site, where they documented the descendants of Louis Robideau and Marie Felicicte (Sophie) Vivais, the father and mother of MaryAnn Jesmer. The web site is…. http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~mercierhedlund/genealogy/pafg08.htm#182

It is the Mercier/Sharp & Hedlund/Carlson Genealogy Page

The Robideau family members seemed to have lived in a town called Foreston Minnesota. It is 12 miles north of Greenbush Township. A post office has been in operation since 1889. The city was named for the forests near the original town site. Joseph Robideau and Catherine Jesmer first moved to Minneapolis and then to Princeton, and then to a farm in Greenbush Township. Joseph was a brother of Maryann. Catherine Jesmer was a first cousin of Joseph A. Jesmer and she was not his sister. She was the daughter of Louis, while Joseph was the son of Joseph, Louis’ brother. Maryann was living very close to her brother Peter and Joseph Robideau. Later on, Joseph and Catherine went on to owned a hotel in Foreston. They had thirteen kids.

The Foreston Hotel

Here is where it gets a little tricky. Joseph and Catherine Robideau had a girl, Julianne Robideau. She married A.D. Jesmer, the brother of Joseph A. Jesmer. Adolph. D. Jesmer, Maryann Jesmer’s brother in law, married her niece, Julianne. That means that Julianne Jesmer, was the cousin and the aunt of my great grandfather Nelson Adulphus Jesmer. It has been said that A.D. Jesmer married his first cousin, but I don’t think so. Catherine Jesmer (his wife’s mother) was, a first cousin, the daughter of Louis while A.D Jesmer was the son of Louis’ brother Joseph. And so that would make his wife his second cousin. From 1882 to 1895 they were living in Foreston. In 1895 Adolph D Jesmer was 49 years old and Julia A Jesmer was 46 years old. By 1900 A.D. Jesmer was working in saw mill in Todd county 65 miles north west. Later on, they moved to Park Rapids, about 160 miles north of Foreston.

(Adolphus D. Jesmer [Parents] was born on 7 Jul 1846 in Franklin Co, NY. He was christened on 17 Jul 1846 in St Patricks, Hogansburg, Franklin, NY. He died on 14 Apr 1920 in Greenbush Twp, Mille Lacs, MN. He was buried in Greenbush Catholic Cemetery, Mille Lacs, MN. He married Julianne Robideau on 9 Sep 1868 in MN.

Julianne Robideau [Parents] was born on 26 May 1848 in Franklin Co, NY. She was christened on 28 May 1848 in St Regis RC, Huntingdon, PQ. She died on 6 Oct 1911 in St Marys Hosp, Minneapolis, Henn, MN. The cause of death was “Pemphigus” (GF). She was buried in Greenbush Catholic Cemetery, Mille Lacs, MN. She married Adolphus D. Jesmer on 9 Sep 1868 in MN.)

http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~mercierhedlund/genealogy/pafg20.htm#460

 

Peter Sidney Robideau, the son of Louis Robideau and Julia (Jesmer) of Greenbush Township, was living in Foreston. It is said that he was one of the founders of the St Louis Catholic Church in Foreston. (This is according to the St Cloud Diocese in Foreston.)

With all of the activity of the Robideau family in Foreston, there are no Jesmers or Robideaus buried in the St Louis Catholic Cemetery in Foreston. They came to the area, lived in Foreston then most of these people moved westward.

Francis Xavier Robideau and Adeline– their descendants ended up in Cornwall Ontario.

Francis Albert Robideau: His descendants ended up in upper state New York. C.J Robideau could have gone to Minneapolis.

Marguerite (Robideau) Sawyer: Some descendants in Princeton MN.

Antoine Robideau and Christina: Their descendants lived in Upper State New York and Cornwall Ontario.

Joseph Robideau and Catherine Jesmer owned a hotel in Foreston. Joseph was a brother of Maryann. Catherine Jesmer was a second cousin of Joseph A. Jesmer and not his sister. He died on 7 Nov 1891 in Foreston, Mille Lacs, MN. The cause of death was Paralysis (GF). Catherine moved out west after the death of her husband. They had son that moved to Ottawa Canada.

Peter Robideau and Julia Jesmer came to Minnesota in 1868. In 1870 they were living on a farm in Greenbush Township. In 1875, Peter’s father, Louis is living with Peter on his farm. They had fourteen kids. Louis had moved to the area after the death of his wife. It would be one year later that Joseph A. jesmer and Maryanne (Robideau) Jesmer, my G-G-grandparents would also break ground on their own farm of 160 acres in Greenbush Township. That means that Mary’s brother, Peter and, Joseph’s sister Julia, were in Greenbush at least six years before Joseph A. and Maryann Jesmer came the area. They led the way for the exodus to Greenbush Township MN.

And so, it seemed that Maryann had a few relatives living near her in Minnesota. There was Peter her brother with nieces and nephews on a nearby farm. She had her father, Louis, living in Peter’s farm. There was Joseph, running a hotel in Foreston 12 mile north of their farm. There were also some “Robideau” nieces and nephews living in Minneapolis. The other siblings and their descendants either remained in Upper State New York, near Massena or in Cornwall Ontario. She probably did not see those siblings and their families at all. It is a very long way away. Her dad died in Greenbush at the age of 92 years in 1886. MaryAnn died of cancer in 1889.